Saturday, September 8, 2012

How to Use Trace Upstream, Domain Manager and Facility Manager in InfoSewer to Find the CE

Subject:   How to Use Trace Upstream, Domain Manager and Facility Manager in InfoSewer to Find the CE

How to Use Trace Upstream, Domain Manager and Facility Manager in InfoSewer to Find the CE

by dickinsonre
Subject:   How to Use Trace Upstream, Domain Manager and Facility Manager in InfoSewer to Find the CE

InfoSewer does not have table of node continuity errors only an overall continuity error balance.  If you have a continuity error then you can use the process of divide and conquer to find the continuity error.  Start at the Outlets and using the Trace Upstream command, Domain Manager and Facility Manager take out whole sections of the network until you isolate the section of the network with the continuity error.    Here are the steps you can take:

Step 1.             Use Trace Upstream Network to find the and place in a Domain the Upstream Network (Figure 1).
Step 2.                          Once the upstream domain is created use the Domain Manager to add in any extra links without nodes (Figure 2)
Step 3.             Make the Domain Inactive using Facility Manger (Figure 3)
Step 4.                        Run the network and check the overall continuity error (Figure 4)
Step 5.                         Continue and repeat until you isolate the area that is the main source of the Continuity Error (CE).

Figure 1.  Trace Upstream Network and Place it in a Domain

Figure 2.  Use Domain Manager to take out links without nodes

Figure 3.  Use Facility Manager to Make the Domain Inactive
Figure 4.  Find and Isolate the Area with the CE.








Tuesday, September 4, 2012

InfoSWMM (d/D v. Surcharge d/D)

Subject:   InfoSWMM (d/D v. Surcharge d/D)

What is the difference between the output variables d/D and Surcharge d/D in InfoSWMM and H2OMap SWMM

The d/D is calculated as link capacity based on the midpoint depth of water in the link or Link depth/ Link Maximum Depth
            Since the depth in the link is restricted to the Maximum Depth the d/D value is always between 0 and 1
The Surcharged d/D is calculated from the end node depths at each end of the link
            The two node depths are averaged and the value of Surcharge d/D is the Average Node Depth / Link Maximum Depth,
The value of Surcharge d/D varies from 0 to a large number depending on the maximum depths of the nodes and the possible surcharge depth of the nodes

The value of d/D is based on the middle of the link and the value of Surcharge d/D is based on the average of the node depths at the end of the link.  They may be and often are different.   However, if you have a Surcharge d/D greater than 1 it will indicate at least one end of the link is surcharged.  A Surcharge d/D may be greater than 1 with a d/D less than 1 due to the ends of the node being surcharged and not surcharged.

·         A Surcharged d/D indicates that at least one end of the link is Full, but
·         A d/D value less than 1 does not preclude that one end may be Surcharged.


InfoSWMM (d/D v. Surcharge d/D)

by dickinsonre
Subject:   InfoSWMM (d/D v. Surcharge d/D)

What is the difference between the output variables d/D and Surcharge d/D in InfoSWMM and H2OMap SWMM

The d/D is calculated as link capacity based on the midpoint depth of water in the link or Link depth/ Link Maximum Depth
            Since the depth in the link is restricted to the Maximum Depth the d/D value is always between 0 and 1

The Surcharged d/D is calculated from the end node depths at each end of the link

            The two node depths are averaged and the value of Surcharge d/D is the Average Node Depth / Link Maximum Depth,
The value of Surcharge d/D varies from 0 to a large number depending on the maximum depths of the nodes and the possible surcharge depth of the nodes

The value of d/D is based on the middle of the link and the value of Surcharge d/D is based on the average of the node depths at the end of the link.  They may be and often are different.   However, if you have a Surcharge d/D greater than 1 it will indicate at least one end of the link is surcharged.  A Surcharge d/D may be greater than 1 with a d/Dless than 1 due to the ends of the node being surcharged and not surcharged.

·         A Surcharged d/D indicates that at least one end of the link is Full, but
·         A d/D value less than 1 does not preclude that one end may be Surcharged.

Figure 1.  Plot of d/D and Surcharged d/D in InfoSWMM.



Monday, September 3, 2012

Reasons A Pump H-Q Curve may be Different than the Design Curve

Subject:   Reasons A Pump H-Q Curve may be Different than the Design Curve

From Allan R. Budris and Water World

Actual system H-Q curve not known:
The actual current system H-Q curve may be different than the original system design. Once a plant is commissioned and the plant is put in service, the system head begins to change. In the short term, levels change in the tanks and wells, valves open and close, and filter screens become clogged. As maintenance occurs, pipe schedules are changed, equipment is changed and new equipment is added into the system. In the long term, equipment loses efficiency, scale forms on the internal pipe walls and the plant undergoes expansion and contraction. Even when new, the original calculated system curve may differ from the actual system performance due to the assumptions used in the calculation, such as 10 year old pipe. Any pump change should, therefore, start with the development (confirmation) of the true current pumping system “Head-Capacity” curve, as detailed in the writer’s January 2009 Column on: “Creating an Accurate Pumping System Head-Capacity Curve...“ A field test of the pump total developed head at one or more measured flow rates can help determine the actual (current) pump and system H-Q curves. By developing the true system head-capacity curve, an accurate determination of the current and new pump operating conditions can be established.

Additional references on aging pumps




From Pump System Hydraulic Design 10.2.4 Determination of Pump Operating Points—Single Pump
The system curve is superimposed over the pump curve; (Fig. 10.6). The pump operating points occur at the intersections of the system curves with the pump curves. It should be observed that the operating point will change with time. As the piping ages and becomes rougher, the system curve will become steeper, and the intersecting point with the pump curve will move to the left. Also, as the impeller wears, the pump curve moves downward. Thus, over a period of time, the output capacity of a pump can decrease significantly. See Fig. 10.7. for a visual depiction of these combined effects
.


Saturday, September 1, 2012

Storage Nodes in InfoSWMM and H2OMAP SWMM

Subject:   Storage Nodes in InfoSWMM and H2OMAP SWMM

Figure 1 shows how to use the various constants, coefficients and exponents in the Storage or Wet Well data of H2OMAP SWMM.     If you have a Wet Well or Storage Diameter you should convert the Wet Well diameters into an Area with the units of either square feet or square meters.  The computed area will then be a constant or coefficient in the Attribute Browser.  You would only use the exponent or a table of depth and area if the Wet Well area varies with depth. 
Figure 1.  Options for Defining a Storage Node in H2OMAP SWMM or SWMM 5





InfoSWMM Version Numbers and the version of Arc Map they use and which EPA SWMM5 Engine is used for Each InfoSWMM Version

 InfoSWMM Version Numbers  InfoSWMM Version 14.7  Update 3 for Arc Map 10 to 10.8 and Windows 7/8/8.1/10 - EPA SWMM 5.1.014   4/12/2020   ...